Use Luminosity Masks to Dodge and Burn

To create impact and affect the way someone views our images is is by leading them on a visual journey. One of the best tools available to us to control this is to use luminosity masks to dodge and burn.

This tutorial uses a previous version of our luminosity panel, the techniques are still relevant with our current panel.

Video Duration: 20:07

This tutorial focuses on how to use luminosity masks to dodge and burn your images for maximum impact. I talk about the vision for the finished image then show several techniques for making accurate selections with Luminosity so that we can use them with the dodging and burning tools built into ADPpanel+Pro to have accurate control over light and how our viewers see our images.

Step 1: Determining The Hero’s In The Image

Before we commence any editing we should always ask ourselves “what is this image about”. It’s a very important question to ask, as it will help us significantly during the edit. Understanding what the image is about is very important before we start the edit. Talking through the image I discuss what I think is important, helping to set the direction of the edit. The juxtaposition of the man made shack against the beautiful Mount Rundle was the main feature.

Step 2: Use Luminosity Masks To Dodge and Burn to Bring Life To The Focal Points

Breaking down my adjustments to single areas of the image, I focus in on the hero’s of the image. This allows me to work on them independently and not worry about other areas being adversely effected. Using luminosity masks I work on the snow in the mountains and the shack separately. I want to ensure they stand out against the rest of the image.

Step 3: Draw The Eye Out Of The Sky

Dramatic and highly textured can be interesting, they can act as a distraction. Skies are something that should compliment our image, and not necessarily be a feature. Using luminosity masks I make a selection of the light tones in the image. Then using a burn layer I darken the sky and other perimeter areas to bring the eye down into the image.